See also: waż, wąż, Wąż, and wȧz

English

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Noun

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waz

  1. Alternative form of wazz (act of urination)

See also

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Anagrams

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Jersey Dutch

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Cognate to Dutch was (was). Compare English was.

Pronunciation

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Verb

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waz

  1. was (third person singular past tense of the copula)
    • 1912, Tijdschrift voor Nederlandsche taal— en letterkunde, volumes 31-32, page 309:
      Hāi waz nît tevrêde täus []
      He was not content at home []

Middle High German

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Etymology

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From Old High German waz.

Pronoun

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waȥ

  1. what

Declension

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Declension of waȥ
nominative waȥ
genitive wës
dative wëm, wëme
accusative waȥ
accusative wiu
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Descendants

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  • Alemannic German: waas, waa; was, wa (unstressed)
  • Central Franconian: wat
  • Cimbrian: bas, baz (Luserna)
  • Hunsrik: was
  • German: was
  • Luxembourgish: wat
  • Yiddish: וואָס (vos)

Old High German

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Proto-Germanic *hwat, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷod. Cognate with Dutch wat, English what, Danish hvad. More at what.

Pronunciation

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IPA(key): /was/

Pronoun

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waȥ

  1. what

Declension

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Declension of waȥ
nominative waȥ
genitive wes
dative wemu, wemo
accusative waȥ
instrumental wiu
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  • wer (who)

Descendants

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References

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  1. Joseph Wright, 'An Old High German Primer, Second Edition'

Polish

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /vas/
  • Rhymes: -as
  • Syllabification: waz

Noun

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waz f

  1. genitive plural of waza

Yola

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Verb

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waz

  1. Alternative form of waas
    • 1867, CONGRATULATORY ADDRESS IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 114, lines 12-14:
      az avare ye trad dicke londe yer name waz ee-kent var ee vriene o' livertie, an He fo brake ye neckarès o' zlaves.
      for before your foot pressed the soil, your name was known to us as the friend of liberty, and he who broke the fetters of the slave.

References

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  • Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828) William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867, page 114