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See also: Weh

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

weh

  1. Alternative form of wah
    • 1864, Flora Dawson, Princes, Public Men, and Pretty Women: Episodes in Real Life:
      oh weh ! oh weh ! " — Sweetest mother, you have the illness ; oh weh ! oh weh ! It was so
    • 1910, Katherine Mansfield, The Child-Who_Was-Tired:
      "Oh, weh! oh, weh!" The Child-Who-Was-Tired pushed and pulled them apart, muffled them into their coats, and drove them out of the house.
    • 1992, Ewa Kuryluk, Century 21, ISBN 156478018X, page 307:
      Perhaps it's in Lausanne, at the shore of Lake Leman, and in the widow's arms that Wolf wrote Oh weh! Perhaps she whispered it into his ear, when they first slept together, or when he parted from her. Perhaps it was her oh weh! he could never forget.
    • 2008, Bluedan, Resume, ISBN 1438929862, page 7:
      I tell you that it's true compassion, baby, oh weh.
    • 2012, Regina F. Bendix & ‎Galit Hasan-Rokem, A Companion to Folklore, ISBN 1444354388, page 90:
      "Kill one village, But leave another. Kill one village, But leave another. On the lake: weh weh weh weh weh.
    • 2017, Frank Hamilton Cushing, Zuñi Folk Tales:
      At last one night the Master of Sorcerers in secret places raised his voice and cried: “Weh-h-h-h! Weh-h-h-h-h-h!”


Usage notesEdit

The word is often extended, for instance "wehhhhhhh", "weeeeeeh", etc.

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German , from Proto-Germanic *wai, from Proto-Indo-European *wai. Compare Dutch wee, English woe, Danish and Swedish ve, Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐌹 (wai).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

weh (comparative weher, superlative am wehsten)

  1. sore, painful

DeclensionEdit

InterjectionEdit

weh

  1. alas! woe!

ReferencesEdit

  • Cassell's German and English Dictionary (1933)

Pennsylvania GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare German weh.

AdjectiveEdit

weh

  1. sore, painful