Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English whist(silent).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

whist ‎(plural whists)

  1. Any of several four-player card games, similar to bridge.
  2. Sessions of playing the card game.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

whist ‎(comparative more whist, superlative most whist)

  1. (rare) Silent.

VerbEdit

whist ‎(third-person singular simple present whists, present participle whisting, simple past and past participle whisted)

  1. (transitive, rare) To hush or silence; to still.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
  2. (intransitive, rare) To become silent.
    • 1623, William Shakespeare, The Tempest:
      Come unto these yellow sands, / And then take hands: / Courtsied when you have and kiss'd / The wild waves whist, / Foot it featly here and there; / And, sweet sprites, the burthen bear.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Surrey to this entry?)

InterjectionEdit

whist

  1. Alternative spelling of whisht Silence! Quiet! Hush! Shhh!
    • 1860, anonymous, Heroes and Hunters of the West[1], HTML edition, The Gutenberg Project, published 2008:
      … for scarcely had they descended one hundred feet, when a low “whist” from the girl, warned them of present danger.

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from English whist.

NounEdit

whist m

  1. whist

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from English whist.

NounEdit

whist m ‎(uncountable)

  1. whist

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from English whist.

NounEdit

whist m ‎(invariable)

  1. whist (card game)