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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

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NounEdit

whist (countable and uncountable, plural whists)

  1. Any of several four-player card games, similar to bridge.
  2. A session of playing this card game.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English whist (silent), possibly onomatopoeic.

InterjectionEdit

whist

  1. Alternative spelling of whisht. Silence!, quiet!, hush!, shhh!, shush!
    • 1860, anonymous, Heroes and Hunters of the West[1], HTML edition, The Gutenberg Project, published 2008:
      … for scarcely had they descended one hundred feet, when a low “whist” from the girl, warned them of present danger.

VerbEdit

whist (third-person singular simple present whists, present participle whisting, simple past and past participle whisted)

  1. (transitive, rare) To hush, shush, or silence; to still.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
  2. (intransitive, rare) To become silent.
    • 1623, William Shakespeare, The Tempest:
      Come unto these yellow sands, / And then take hands: / Courtsied when you have and kiss'd / The wild waves whist, / Foot it featly here and there; / And, sweet sprites, the burthen bear.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Surrey to this entry?)

AdjectiveEdit

whist (comparative more whist, superlative most whist)

  1. (rare) Silent.

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

 
Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English whist.

NounEdit

whist m

  1. whist

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English whist.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

whist m (uncountable)

  1. whist

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English whist.

NounEdit

whist m (invariable)

  1. whist (card game)