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See also: wif-

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Alteration of with.

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

wif

  1. (informal, dialectal, nonstandard) with
    • 1998, Ted Shine, Contributions, →ISBN, page 31:
      That's what I mo' wear wif my shoes.
    • 2000, Jan King, It'a A Girl Thing: The Hilarious Truth About Women, →ISBN, page 161:
      I been at the gym gettin' down wif my peeps.
    • 2002, Stan Hayes, The Rough English Equivalent, →ISBN, page 324:
      If I don' have no problem wif my high school test?

AnagramsEdit


MapudungunEdit

AdjectiveEdit

wif (using Raguileo Alphabet)

  1. long
  2. straight

AdverbEdit

wif (using Raguileo Alphabet)

  1. directly

NounEdit

wif (using Raguileo Alphabet)

  1. irrigation ditch

ReferencesEdit

  • Wixaleyiñ: Mapucezugun-wigkazugun pici hemvlcijka (Wixaleyiñ: Small Mapudungun-Spanish dictionary), Beretta, Marta; Cañumil, Dario; Cañumil, Tulio, 2008.

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English wīf, from Proto-Germanic *wībą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wif (plural wifes or wives or wive)

  1. woman, female human
  2. wife, female spouse
    • ca. 1380: It cam in cuppemele — this craft my wif used! — William Langland, Piers Plowman
    • ca. 1380, — Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales, The Merchant's Tale
      That in a morwe unto this May saith he
      Rys up, my wif, my love, my lady fre
  3. The leading woman of a household; a matriarch.
  4. A female animal, especially one mating.
  5. A concubine.

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *wībą, of uncertain origin. Cognate with Old Frisian wīf, Old Saxon wīf, Dutch wijf, Old High German vīp (German Weib (woman)), Old Norse víf (Danish viv). Tocharian B kwīpe, Tocharian A kip (vagina) and Albanian cipë (sense of shame, membrane) may be cognates, suggesting a Proto-Indo-European *gʰwih₂bʰ-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wīf n

  1. woman
  2. wife

DeclensionEdit

AntonymsEdit

  • wer (with respect to gender)

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old FrisianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *wībą, of uncertain origin.

NounEdit

wīf n

  1. woman

West FrisianEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

wif (comp. wiffer, sup. wiffest)

  1. shaky
  2. impermanent
  3. fickle, indecisive