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EnglishEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
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A wigwam at Lefferts Historic House Museum, Brooklyn, New York

EtymologyEdit

From Western Abenaki wigwôm or Eastern Abenaki (Penobscot) wigwom[1] (both meaning "house"), from Proto-Algonquian *wi·kiwa·ʔmi (house). Doublet of wickiup.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wigwam (plural wigwams)

  1. A dwelling having an arched framework overlaid with bark, hides, or mats, used by Native Americans in the northeastern United States.
  2. (possibly dated) Any more or less similar dwelling used by indigenous people in other parts of the world.
    • 1813, John Gabriel Stedman, Narrative, of a five years' expedition, against the revolted..., volume 1, page 403:
      Their houses or wigwams, which they call carbets, are built as I have already described those of the negroes; but instead of being covered with the leaves of the manicole-tree, they are covered with the leaves of rattans or jointed canes, here called tas, []
    • 1845 edition, Charles Darwin, Journal and Remarks (The Voyage of the Beagle):
      The Fuegian wigwam resembles, in size and dimensions, a haycock. It merely consists of a few broken branches stuck in the ground, and very imperfectly thatched on one side with a few tufts of grass and rushes.

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

wigwam (third-person singular simple present wigwams, present participle wigwamming, simple past and past participle wigwammed)

  1. (transitive) To dry (flax or straw) by standing it outside in the shape of a wigwam.

See alsoEdit

  • other traditional Native American dwellings:
    • hogan (used by the Navajo in the southwestern United States)
    • igloo (used by the Inuit, made of snow)
    • teepee (used in the Great Plains)
    • tupik (used by the Inuit during the summer)
    • wetu (used by the Wampanoag in the northeastern United States)
    • wickiup (used in the southwestern and western United States)
    • wigwam (used in the northeastern United States)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 1918, Frank G. Speck, Newell Lion, Penobscot Transformer Tales, in the International Journal of American Linguistics, volume 1, number 3 (August 1918)

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English wigwam.

NounEdit

wigwam m (invariable)

  1. wigwam

PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English wigwam.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wigwam m inan

  1. wigwam

DeclensionEdit

Usage notesEdit

  • Sometimes incorrectly used to refer to a teepee.

PotawatomiEdit

NounEdit

wigwam

  1. house

ReferencesEdit

  • Donald Perrot (2017) Memejek Ebodewadmimyak: Mnokmek, Amazon.com