EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Variant of standard English wood, from Old English wōd (mad, insane).

AdjectiveEdit

wud (comparative more wud, superlative most wud)

  1. (dialectal) Mad.
    • 1887, Robert Louis Stevenson, Thrawn Janet, from The Merry Men and Other Tales and Fables,
      Janet ran to him - she was fair wud wi' terror - an' clang to him, an' prayed him, for Christ's sake, save her frae the cummers; an' they, for their pairt, tauld him a' that was ken't, and maybe mair.

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

wud

  1. (nonstandard, informal) Alternative form of would

CebuanoEdit

PhraseEdit

wud

  1. (text messaging) what are you doing?

ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

wud (plural wuds)

  1. (South Scots) wood

VerbEdit

wud

  1. (South Scots) would (uncommon variant of wad)