EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

The verb is derived from Middle English yernen, yern (to express or feel desire; to desire, long or wish for; to lust after; to ask or demand for) [and other forms],[1] from Old English ġeornan (to desire, yearn; to beg) [and other forms], from Proto-West Germanic *girnijan (to be eager for, desire), from Proto-Germanic *girnijaną (to desire, want), from *gernaz (eager, willing) (from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰer- (to yearn for)) + *-janą (suffix forming factitive verbs from adjectives).[2]

The noun is derived from the verb.[3]

VerbEdit

yearn (third-person singular simple present yearns, present participle yearning, simple past and past participle yearned)

  1. (intransitive, also figuratively) To have a strong desire for something or to do something; to long for or to do something.
    All I yearn for is a simple life.
    1. (specifically) To long for something in the past with melancholy or nostalgia.
  2. (intransitive) Of music, words, etc.: to express strong desire or longing.
  3. (intransitive, dated) To have strong feelings of affection, love, sympathy, etc., toward someone.
  4. (intransitive, obsolete) To be distressed or pained; to grieve; to mourn.
  5. (transitive) Often followed by out: to perform (music) which conveys or say (words) which express strong desire or longing.
  6. (transitive, archaic or poetic) To have a strong desire or longing (for something or to do something).
    Synonym: (obsolete) earn
  7. (transitive, obsolete) To cause (someone) to have strong feelings of affection, love, sympathy, etc.; also, to grieve or pain (someone).
    Synonym: (obsolete) earn
    • c. 1597, William Shakespeare, “The Merry VViues of VVindsor”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act III, scene v], page 52, column 2:
      Well, ſhe laments Sir for it, that it would yern your heart to see it: []
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, “The Life of Henry the Fift”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act IV, scene iii], page 86, column 2:
      It yernes me not, if men my Garments weare; / Nor care I who doth feed vpon my coſt: / Such outward things dwell not in my deſires. / But if it be a ſinne to couet Honor, / I am the moſt offending Soule aliue.
    • 1833, [William Hamilton Maxwell], “Badger-hunting”, in The Field Book: Or, Sports and Pastimes of the United Kingdom; [], London: Effingham Wilson, OCLC 57230597, page 31, column 2:
      When the badger finds that the terriers yearn him in his burrow, he will stop the hole between him and the terriers; []
    • 1834 June 25, Leigh Hunt, “A Pinch of Snuff (Concluded.)”, in Leigh Hunt’s London Journal, volume I, number 13, London: Charles Knight, []; and Henry Hooper, [], OCLC 276731836, page 98, column 1:
      Wants to sneeze and cannot do it! / Now it yearns me, thrills me, stings me, / Now with rapturous torment wrings me, / Now says “Sneeze, you fool; get through it.”
ConjugationEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

yearn (plural yearns)

  1. A strong desire or longing; a yearning, a yen.
    • 1917 August 12, "A YEARN FOR PEACE; Pan-Germanism Denounced" Sunday Times (Perth, WA) p.1
    • 1979 Norman Mailer, The Executioner's Song
      Gibbs now said he wasn't going to pull any punches with Gary when he knew how jealous a man could get, so he also wanted to tell him that Phil Hansen was reputed to have a yearn for attractive ladies.
    • 2010 Frank Buchmann-Moller Someone to Watch Over Me: The Life and Music of Ben Webster (University of Michigan Press) →ISBN p.57
      "After he had made a record date with us in 1935, I always had a yearn for Ben," he said years later.
    • 2014 February 13, AFP, "Why internet adultery numbers are soaring" New Zealand Herald
      "My guess, however, is that it has because there are many people who have a yearn for sex outside their relationship but wouldn't have the slightest idea about how to do it or do it safely," Prof Schwartz added.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Probably either:[4]

VerbEdit

yearn (third-person singular simple present yearns, present participle yearning, simple past and past participle yearned)

  1. (Northern England, Scotland, intransitive)
    1. Of milk: to curdle, especially in the cheesemaking process.
      Synonyms: (obsolete or regional) earn, run
    2. Of cheese: to be made from curdled milk.
  2. (Northern England, Scotland, transitive)
    1. To curdle (milk), especially in the cheesemaking process.
    2. To make (cheese) from curdled milk.
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ yernen, v.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.
  2. ^ Compare “yearn, v.1”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2021; “yearn, v.”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  3. ^ yearn, n.”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, March 2018.
  4. ^ yearn, v.2”, in OED Online  , Oxford, Oxfordshire: Oxford University Press, December 2020.
  5. ^ rennen, v.(1)”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

AnagramsEdit