EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English yonder, yondre, ȝondre, ȝendre, from Old English ġeonre (thither; yonder, adverb), equivalent to yond (from ġeond, from Proto-Germanic *jainaz) + -er, as in hither, thither. Cognate with Scots ȝondir (yonder), Dutch ginder (over there; yonder), Gothic 𐌾𐌰𐌹𐌽𐌳𐍂𐌴 (jaindrē, thither).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

yonder (not comparable)

  1. (archaic or dialect) At or in a distant but indicated place.
    Whose doublewide is that over yonder?
  2. (archaic or dialect) Synonym of thither: to a distant but indicated place.
    They headed on over yonder.

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AdjectiveEdit

yonder (comparative more yonder, superlative most yonder)

  1. (archaic or dialect) The farther, the more distant of two choices.
    • 1834, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Francesca Carrara, volume 2, page 163:
      "You have all necessary proofs in your possession, though you may not be aware of their existence," replied Arden; "will you allow me to open yonder box?"

SynonymsEdit

DeterminerEdit

yonder

  1. (archaic or dialect, as an adjective) Who or which is over yonder, usually distant but within sight.
    Yonder lass, who be she?
  2. (archaic or dialect, as a pronoun) One who or which is over yonder, usually distant but within sight.
    The yonder is Queen Niobe.

SynonymsEdit

  • (distant but within sight): yon

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NounEdit

yonder (plural yonders)

  1. (literary) The vast distance, particularly the sky or trackless forest.

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AnagramsEdit