EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

youthful +‎ -ize

VerbEdit

youthfulize (third-person singular simple present youthfulizes, present participle youthfulizing, simple past and past participle youthfulized)

  1. (transitive) To make youthful.
    • 1862, “The Age of Liars,” Advent Herald, Volume 23, No. 50, Boston, 16 December, 1862, p. 396,[1]
      The question is not whether a preacher is pious, prayerful, faithful, sound in faith and a winner of souls [] Is he smart? That’s the question. [] will he [] as occasion may require, let off good round whoppers, thumping stories, and rouse us all up? Then he is the man for us. He will fill the house, sell the pews, youthfulize the congregation, and make us a good speculation.
    • 1982, Edwin Newman, “Language on the Skids” in Paul Eschholz et al. (eds.), Language Awareness, New York: St. Martin’s Press, 3rd edition, p. 21,[2]
      Some plastic surgeons, advertising a customized approach, promise “wrinkles youthfulized.” This, apparently, leaves the patient with young wrinkles.
    • 1994, John Nichols, Conjugal Bliss: A Comedy of Marital Arts, New York: Henry Holt & Co., p. 109,[3]
      She massaged her features with vitamin E oil and other compounds of mysterious youthfulizing powers.