EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English yowe, yeue, forms of ewe, from Old English ēowu. Compare Scots cognate yowe.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

yowe (plural yowes)

  1. (archaic, dialect, Britain, Scotland) A ewe; a female sheep.
    • 1902, James Thomson, Recollections of a Speyside parish:
      The ram was marked wi' keel at the reet o' the tail an' the yowes upon their hips.

Etymology 2Edit

PronounEdit

yowe

  1. Obsolete form of you.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

yowe

  1. Alternative form of ewe

Etymology 2Edit

PronounEdit

yowe

  1. Alternative form of yow
    • 1440, Letter, in: 1841, Joseph Stevenson (editor), The Correspondence, Inventories, Account Rolls, and Law Proceedings of the Priory of Coldingham, page 116:
      Wirshipfull sir, I commend me to yowe; thankyng yowe of all tendirnesse and labour of lang time shewid to my brether and our cell of Coldyngham, prayand yowe of yowr goode continuance.

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English ewe, from Old English ēowu, from Proto-Germanic *awiz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ówis (sheep).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

yowe (plural yowes)

  1. ewe (female sheep)
    • 1794, Robert Burns, The Highland Widow's Lament:
      And there I had three score o' yowes, / Ochon, Ochon, Ochrie! / Skipping on yon bonie knowes, / And casting woo' to me.
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit


SwahiliEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

yowe (ma class, plural mayowe)

  1. shout (a loud burst of voice)
    Acha kupiga mayowe
    Don't shout

YolaEdit

NounEdit

yowe

  1. ewe; a female sheep