See also: þuk, yuk-, and yük

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Interjection

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yuk

  1. (onomatopoeia) An exuberant laugh.

Noun

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yuk (plural yuks)

  1. (slang) Something, such as a joke, that causes such a laugh.
    • 1992, Alan S. Blinder, Business Week, numbers 3268-3272:
      The latest yuk from Congress is called the balanced-budget amendment. It could wind up making slumps deeper and recoveries more difficult — and that's no joke.

Verb

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yuk (third-person singular simple present yuks, present participle yukking, simple past and past participle yukked)

  1. To laugh exuberantly.
Derived terms
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See also

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Etymology 2

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Interjection

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yuk

  1. Alternative spelling of yuck (disgust)
    • 1988 May 7, Nancy M. Gill, “I Don't Always Agree, But I Appreciate GCN”, in Gay Community News, page 4:
      Yuk! Egg on my face! With my usual wait 'til it's history GCN reading habits, I opened my April Fools issue and began to read the election year news; it did not occur to this avid reader that anything was being spoofed until the second paragraph.

Anagrams

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Biak

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Etymology

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Borrowed from a truncation of English ukulele, from Hawaiian ʻukulele, from ʻuku (flea, louse) + lele (jumping). Doublet of uk.

Noun

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yuk

  1. ukulele

Indonesian

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Etymology

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Clipping of ayo.

Interjection

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yuk

  1. go ahead

Further reading

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Lacandon

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Noun

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yuk

  1. red brocket

Lashi

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Pronunciation

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Classifier

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yuk

  1. classifier for humans

Noun

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yuk

  1. person

Verb

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yuk

  1. to grow

References

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  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[1], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis)

Marshallese

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Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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yuk

  1. you (singular); thou.

References

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Tocharian A

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Etymology

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From Proto-Tocharian *yäkwe, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁éḱwos, whence also Latin equus, Old Irish ech. Compare with Tocharian B yakwe.

Noun

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yuk

  1. horse

Uzbek

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Other scripts
Cyrillic юк (yuk)
Latin yuk
Perso-Arabic

Etymology

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From Proto-Turkic *yük (load, burden).

Noun

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yuk (plural yuklar)

  1. cargo, luggage

Derived terms

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Yup'ik

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Alternative forms

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  • (Nunivak Island, Chevak) cuk
  • (Middle Yukon) suk

Etymology

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From Proto-Yupik *yuɣ, from Proto-Eskimo *iŋuɣ. Compare Greenlandic inuk.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈjuk/, [ˈjuk]
  • Hyphenation: yuk

Noun

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yuk

  1. person; human being

Declension

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References

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  • Osahito Miyaoka (2012) A grammar of Central Alaskan Yupik (CAY), De Gruyter Mouton, →ISBN, page 41
  • Steven A. Jacobson (2012) “yuk”, in Yup'ik Eskimo Dictionary (Volume 1), Alaska Native Language Center, →ISBN