zebra crossing

EnglishEdit

 
zebra crossing

EtymologyEdit

From the similarity of the stripes to those of a zebra.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

zebra crossing (plural zebra crossings)

  1. (Australia, Britain, New Zealand) A pedestrian crossing featuring broad white stripes painted parallel to the street.
    • 1979, Douglas Adams, chapter 6, in The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, London: Pan Books, page 50:
      'Oh, that was easy,' says Man, and for an encore goes on to prove that black is white and gets himself killed on the next zebra crossing.
    • 2003, The Highway Code for Northern Ireland, The Stationery Office, →ISBN, page 16:
      Do not ride across a pelican, puffin or zebra crossing. Dismount and wheel your cycle across.
    • 2008 December 16, Roy, Arundhati, The God of Small Things[1], Random House, →ISBN, OL 24604480M, Ch. 1:
      They also believed that if they were killed on a zebra crossing, the Government would pay for their funerals. They had the definite impression that that was what zebra crossings were meant for. Free funerals.
    • 2010 December 22, “Beatles' Abbey Road zebra crossing given listed status”, in BBC News[2]:
      The Abbey Road zebra crossing in north London — made famous after appearing on a Beatles album cover — has been given Grade II listed status.

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