Last modified on 24 May 2014, at 18:05

Euroclydon

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Hellenistic Ancient Greek εὐροκλύδων (euroklúdōn), from εὖρος (eûros, east wind) + κλύδων (klúdōn, wave).

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Euroclydon

  1. A stormy northeasterly wind mentioned in the Bible (Acts 27:14); any rough wind or storm.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby-Dick:
      It stood on a sharp bleak corner, where that tempestuous wind Euroclydon kept up a worse howling than ever it did about poor Paul's tossed craft. Euroclydon, nevertheless, is a mighty pleasant zephyr to any one in-doors, with his feet on the hob quietly toasting for bed.