Last modified on 20 January 2008, at 07:07

Talk:2L

Return to "2L" page.

http://www.google.com/search?q=%222L%22+site%3A.law.harvard.edu http://www.google.com/search?q=%222L%22+site%3A.law.yale.edu http://www.google.com/search?q=%222L%22+site%3A.law.stanford.edu http://www.google.com/search?q=%222L%22+site%3A.law.columbia.edu http://www.google.com/search?q=%222L%22+site%3A.law.uchicago.edu

There is no dispute whatsoever that this term is in widespread use. It is used in publish work; not only published on the internet, but the well-known book "One L" uses the convention extensively. Its use in the professional literature of legal education is widespread. See Jenée Desmond-Harris, "Public Interest Drift" Revisited: Tracing the Sources of Social Change Commitment Among Black Harvard Law Students, 4 Hastings Race & Poverty L. J. 335, 342 (2007); Celestial S.D. Cassman, A Kinder, Gentler Law School? Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Legal Education at King Hall, 38 U.C. Davis L. Rev. 1209, 1288 (2005). See also Carrie Menkel-Meadow, A Tribute to Robert F. Drinan, S.J.: A Deeply Ethical Man, 95 Geo. L.J. 1713, 1716 (2007); Marty Skrapka, Silence Should Be Golden: A Case Against the Use of a Defendant's Post-arrest, Pre-Miranda Silence as Evidence of Guilt, 59 Okla. L. Rev. 357, fn A1 (2006).

I'm removing the RFV from the main entry. Don't add it back again. --140.247.241.226 14:34, 9 September 2007 (UTC)

Wiktionary:Requests for verification - keptEdit

Kept. See archived discussion of September 2007. 07:07, 20 January 2008 (UTC)