Last modified on 27 April 2013, at 13:25

Talk:clout

  • Discussion
Return to "clout" page.

I see the misuse of the political sense of clout continues. The term originated in Chicago and, without exception, had to include bending, if not outright breaking, a rule. To really be clout in the true sense of the word, it must be borderline illegal. e.g. calling one's clout to get a traffice ticket fixed.

Rare verb use, slangEdit

I'm not convinced this has enough examples yet, but here's the first use

This use of clout is to mean to pull strings for someone by having clout.

  1. SCHAPER: Indeed, it is. Although I wonder if my alderman can clout me in for free. David Schaper, NPR News, Chicago. [1] (The speaker, discussing Chicago and politics, having just been told will need to pay for a ticket, wonders if the tradition of politicians having clout and being able to get free things persists.)