Last modified on 28 August 2009, at 12:55

Talk:crescent roll

Return to "crescent roll" page.

RFV discussion — keptEdit

TK archive icon.svg

The following discussion has been moved from Wiktionary:Requests for verification.

This discussion is no longer live and is left here as an archive. Please do not modify this conversation, though feel free to discuss its conclusions.


Obviously such a thing as a 'crescent roll' or 'crescent-shaped roll' exists but it is not true to say that it is a UK synonym for 'croissant'. In fact there are only 648 UK-only hits for 'crescent roll'. So apart from an modified definition of 'a bread roll in the shape of a crescent' I don't know the purpose of this entry. Kaixinguo 00:17, 17 July 2009 (UTC)

Oops, is a 'crescent roll' American English for 'croissant'? Kaixinguo 00:26, 17 July 2009 (UTC)

After edit conflict:

I am confused about this Request for Verification. An entry does not have to have a demonstrable purpose, not is it actually important that the referent provably exist, only that the term demonstrably exist (ie, be attestable). By entering the term here you are, in effect, requesting that someone demonstrate that the term be "attested" by our standards. But you seem to suggest that you have already found it to be in use on "UK-only" web pages. You have not given evidence that it is not a synonym for croissant.
Wordnet is the only OneLook.com dictionary that has it. It shows it as having "croissant" as a synonym.
I don't think that it is limited to the UK. It is used in many parts of the US and appears 6 times in COCA, which in itself means that it can be attested as a term in use in the US. At Google news of the first hundred of the 700+ total uses at least 90 were from the US, none were clearly from anywhere else. To me the definition seems fine except for the UK tag, which I will change to US.
What still troubles you about this entry? DCDuring TALK 01:04, 17 July 2009 (UTC)
nothing. btw it often happens that american users here nominate or delete english-only usages so I don't expect such a reaction over a simple mistake over a word that doesn't exist here in England. Kaixinguo 01:18, 17 July 2009 (UTC)
resolved.