Last modified on 19 April 2008, at 19:09

Talk:offense

Return to "offense" page.

Need to not shift in stress:

OFFense: Team sports.
offENSE: Other senses.

For whatever reason, individual sports (and some team sports) tend to use "attack" instead. I may be missing something, though. -dmh 04:20, 9 Nov 2004 (UTC)

Huh?Edit

Um, isnt it spelled 'offence'? I got redirected from there =/

ReplyEdit

The US and it's satelites spells it 'offense'. As far as I know, the entire rest of the English speaking world spells it 'offence'. Therefore, naturally, 'offence' is an alternate spelling of the CORRECT spelling 'offense', and not the other way around (end sarcasm).

So why does offence not have its own entry? Dbfirs 12:53, 31 January 2008 (UTC)
All you have to do is make it. —Stephen 22:23, 1 February 2008 (UTC)
It is notable that in UK English offence & defence are the proper spellings, but the derivative words offensive & defensive use 's' in place of 'c'. Though this is the case, some still argue that offense & defense are improper alternate spellings in US English despite the more logical associations to their derivatives. B. Marsh 18:55, 19 April 2008 (UTC)
Yes, some do argue for offense and defense...about 300,000,000 somes. As for the logic of their derivation, defense derives from Latin defenso, and offense from Latin offensus. —Stephen 19:06, 19 April 2008 (UTC)

Offense in law synonym to crime?Edit

Do I understand it correctly that in law, offense is a synonym to crime? [1]. --Daniel Polansky 09:18, 4 February 2008 (UTC)

My 3rd edition of Black's seems to say yes. DCDuring TALK 15:55, 4 February 2008 (UTC)
When used in this context, it would be refer to a 'criminal offense' and the criminal would aptly be named 'the offender'. B. Marsh 18:55, 19 April 2008 (UTC)
In US and, I assume, elsewhere the terminology in use reflects the law of the relevant jurisdiction (in US, Federal or State). Could someone be an offender against a rule or regulation (or a traffic law) without being a criminal? A 'crime' might be restricted to misdemeanor or felony. A common usage seems to make an offender out to be less than a criminal. DCDuring TALK 19:09, 19 April 2008 (UTC)