Last modified on 30 October 2014, at 03:27

crime

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Old French crimne (French crime), from Latin crimen.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

crime (countable and uncountable, plural crimes)

  1. (countable) A specific act committed in violation of the law.
  2. (uncountable) The practice or habit of committing crimes.
    Crime doesn’t pay.
  3. (uncountable) criminal acts collectively.
  4. Any great wickedness or sin; iniquity.
    • Alexander Pope
      No crime was thine, if 'tis no crime to love.
  5. (obsolete) That which occasions crime.
    • Spenser
      the tree of life, the crime of our first father's fall

Usage notesEdit

  • Adjectives often applied to "crime": organized, brutal, terrible, horrible, heinous, horrendous, hideous, financial, sexual, international.

SynonymsEdit

HyponymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin crīmen.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

crime m (plural crimes)

  1. crime
    Le crime ne paie pas.
  2. murder, homicide

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French crime, from Latin crīmen.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

crime m (plural crimes)

  1. crime
    O ladrão cometeu um crime horrível.
    The thief committed a terrible crime.