ailurophiliac

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek αἴλουρος (ailouros, cat) + English -philiac (-philia + -ac), on the pattern of paedophiliac.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ailurophiliac (not comparable)

  1. Appropriate or pleasing to ailurophiles.
    • 1981: American Book Collector, volume 2, page 15 (Moretus Press)
      The year 1927 also produced a splendidly ailurophiliac Black Cat, with woodcuts by Gyula Zilzer, in Middle European style.
    • 1989: Nicolas Slonimsky, Lectionary of Music, page 126 (McGraw-Hill; ISBN 007058222X, 9780070582224)
      She dies, he dies. They become transfigured in some sort of ailurophiliac heaven and live happily ever after.
    • 2001: Katharine M. Rogers, The Cat and the Human Imagination: Feline Images from Bast to Garfield, page 95 (University of Michigan Press; ISBN 9780472087501)
      Gautier’s love of cats was notable even in his ailurophiliac time and place: Nadar made a famous caricature of him sitting plump and happy in his study with a crowd of cats occupying every inch of available space.
    • 2006: Katharine M. Rogers, Cat, page 91 (Reaktion Books; ISBN 1861892926, 9781861892928)
      Théophile Gautier’s love of cats was notable even in his ailurophiliac time and place. One of his favourites, Madame Théophile, was ‘so called because she lived with me on a footing of conjugal intimacy’, following him everywhere and at mealtime often hooking morsels ‘on their way from my plate to my mouth’.
Last modified on 27 November 2013, at 21:53