Last modified on 3 June 2014, at 19:42

automaton

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

The Digesting Duck of Jacques de Vaucanson, hailed in 1739 as the first automaton capable of digestion.
A diagram of a formal automaton.

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek αὐτόματον (autómaton), neuter of αὐτόματος (autómatos, self moving, self willed).

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: ô-tŏm'ə-tən, ô-tŏm'ə-tŏn, IPA(key): /ɔːˈtɒmətən/, /ɔːˈtɒməˌtɒn/

NounEdit

automaton (plural automatons or automata)

  1. A machine or robot designed to follow a precise sequence of instructions.
  2. A person who acts like a machine or robot, often defined as having a monotonous lifestyle and lacking in emotion.
    Due to her strict adherence to her daily schedule, Jessica was becoming more and more convinced that she was an automaton.
    A departure from principle in one instance becomes a precedent for a second, that second for a third, and so on 'til the bulk of the society is reduced to be mere automatons of misery, to have no sensibilities left but for sinning and suffering. - Thomas Jefferson
  3. A formal system, such as finite automaton.
  4. A toy in the form of a mechanical figure.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

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TranslationsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek αὐτόματον (autómaton), neuter of αὐτόματος (autómatos, self-moving, self-willed).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

automaton

  1. automaton.
  2. contraption
  3. device

DeclensionEdit

Second declension neuter, Greek type.

Number Singular Plural
nominative automaton automata
genitive automatī automatōrum
dative automatō automatīs
accusative automaton automata
ablative automatō automatīs
vocative automaton automata