boglet

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

bog +‎ -let

NounEdit

boglet (plural boglets)

  1. A small patch of boggy ground.
    • 1919, Israel Zangwill, Jinny the Carrier:
      The practical Martha was in fact advancing with an improvised leaping-pole that had already carried her neatly over the brook and would obviously bring Bundock over the boglet.

Etymology 2Edit

From Scots

NounEdit

boglet (plural boglets)

  1. A supernatural being.
    • 2011, Rob Thurman, Blackout: A Cal Leandros Novel,
      Goodfellow and the vampire had dropped us off in the limo at the park's south entrance. [...] I was again smacking the claws of the boglet above me. [...] They ate muggers and joggers. [...] "Don't make me shoot off the end of your tail."

AnagramsEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Related to bogle

NounEdit

boglet (plural boglets)

  1. A boglet, a bogle, a ghost or supernatural being.
    • 1991, Tocher, issues 40-43, page 201:
      "Bless us aa," said Robbie, "but he's no a very pleasant lookin corpse. Oh, but he's a boglet." An 'e man says, "Aye, we'll probably make the try an brak he's bones tae get him in because he's died sittin up [in] convulsion."
Last modified on 19 May 2013, at 23:17