Last modified on 18 August 2014, at 06:01

cacier

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin captiāre, present active infinitive of captiō (I capture), from Latin captō. Compare Old French chacier.

VerbEdit

cacier

  1. (transitive, intransitive) to hide
    • circa 1155, Wace, Le Roman de Brut:
      Guendoliene fu iriee
      De ce qu'ensi en fu caciee
      Gwendoline was furious
      about what was hidden

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -ier, with a palatal stem. These verbs are conjugated mostly like verbs in -er, but there is an extra i before the e of some endings. The forms that would normally end in *-c, *-cs, *-ct are modified to z, z, zt. In addition, c becomes ç before an a, o or u to keep the /ts/ sound intact. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

See alsoEdit