chavel

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English chavel, from Old English ċeafl (a bill, beak, snout, jaw, jaw-bone, cheek, cheek-bone), from Proto-Germanic *kaflaz, *keflaz, *kefraz (jaw), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵēbh-, *gēbh- (jaw, gills). Cognate with Middle Low German kavel (jaw, gums, palate), Dutch kevels (jawbones, toothless jaws), Middle High German kivel, kivele, kiuwel (jaw). More at jowl.

NounEdit

chavel (plural chavels)

  1. (obsolete) The jaw, especially, the jaw of a beast.

VerbEdit

chavel (third-person singular simple present chavels, present participle chaveling, simple past and past participle chaveled)

  1. (transitive, dialectal) To chew.

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • tgavel
  • chavè
  • cavegl

EtymologyEdit

From Latin capillus.

NounEdit

chavel m (plural chavels)

  1. (single strand of) hair
Last modified on 21 February 2014, at 17:11