Last modified on 20 May 2014, at 20:55

cleofan

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *kleubaną, from Proto-Indo-European *glewbʰ- (cut, carve). Germanic cognates include Old Saxon kliovan, Middle Dutch clieven (Dutch klieven), Old High German klioban, Old Norse kljúfa.The Indo-European root is also the source of Ancient Greek γλυφειν (gluphein, hollow out), Latin glubere (excoriate), Russian глубокий (glubokij, deep).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

clēofan

  1. to cleave, to split
    Bordweall clufon aforan Eadweardes. Edward’s sons clove the shield-wall. (Anglo-Saxon Chronicles)

ConjugationEdit

DescendantsEdit