clochard

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French clochard.

NounEdit

clochard (plural clochards)

  1. A beggar or tramp, especially in France.
    • 1978, Lawrence Durrell, Livia, Faber & Faber 1992 (Avignon Quintet), p. 492:
      He nearly fell over the Pont Neuf, enjoyed the conversation and esteem of several hairy clochards, and was finally knocked down by a taxi in the Place Vendôme [...].
    • 2000, JG Ballard, Super-Cannes, Fourth Estate 2011, p. 92:
      ‘Those clochards in Cannes, mostly old soixante-huitards. They see a tribute to modern industrial genius and can't resist giving it a swift kick.’

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Disputed, but one possible etymology is clocher (to limp) +‎ -ard.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

clochard m (plural clochards, feminine clocharde)

  1. tramp; vagrant

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French clochard.

NounEdit

clochard m, f (invariable)

  1. tramp, vagrant

SynonymsEdit

Last modified on 3 April 2014, at 01:37