Last modified on 18 June 2013, at 21:21

confusopoly

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Coined in The Dilbert Future by Scott Adams. From confuse by analogy with monopoly and oligopoly.

NounEdit

confusopoly (plural confusopolies)

  1. (neologism, economics) An economic condition whereby the market force of competition is evaded via intentional obfuscation.
    • 1999, "David Marshall", ADSL for 200 quid a month? (discussion on Internet newsgroup alt.dur.general)
      Be aware that BT have just cut some prices, *and* introduced a new tariff that you can buy your way onto. Beware however that it's an even bigger confusopoly than it was before.
    • 2001, Herbert Jack Rotfeld, Adventures in Misplaced Marketing‎
      Instead of the power of monopoly, consumers lose to the power of confusopoly.
    • 2003, "Stevie D", Regulating privatised companies (rail versus telecom, water, electricity, gas) (discussion on Internet newsgroup uk.railway)
      One of the main reasons to have competition is that it leads to lower prices. So now we have a confusopoly where innumerable providers are all offering us special deals but actual prices are being kept artificially high.