coolth

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From cool + -th.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

coolth (uncountable)

  1. The state of being cool, temperature-wise; coolness.
    • 1842, Fanny Burney, Diary and Letters of Madame D'Arblay:
      In the evening my father and Mrs Thrale seated themselves out of doors, just before the Blue-room windows, for coolth and chat; […]
    • 1901, Rudyard Kipling, Kim:
      Through the speckled shadow of the great deodar-forests […] and back into the woodlands’ coolth again […]
    • 1982, Lawrence Durrell, Constance, Penguin 2004 (Avignon Quintet), p. 628:
      The water pushed large blocks of tepid air about around his chair, giving the faint illusion of freshness and coolth.
    • 2012, David Crichton, Fergus Nicol, Adapting Buildings and Cities for Climate Change:
      This they do, not only convectively by passing cooler air over the skins of building occupants, but also using radiant coolth.

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AntonymsEdit

Last modified on 1 February 2014, at 01:34