Last modified on 7 June 2014, at 02:12

début

See also: debut

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French début, from débuter (begin”, “start”, “lead off).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

début (plural débuts)

  1. (chiefly of public perfomers)[1] A person’s or thing’s first appearance before society or another audience; one’s “maiden voyage”.[1]

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

début (third-person singular simple present débuts, present participle débuting, simple past and past participle débuted)

  1. To make one's début.[1]

Usage notesEdit

  • (applicable to all senses) On first reading by a person unfamiliar with this term, debut may be mispronounced [dɪˈbʌt] (cf. rebut) if it is written without the disambiguating acute accent.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 ‖début, n.” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd Ed.; 1989]
  2. ^ A Dictionary of Modern English Usage by H. W. Fowler (1926; Oxford at the Clarendon Press; London: Humphrey Milford), page 104
      début, débutant(e).Début can only be pronounced as French […]
  • The Oxford English Dictionary defines début but does not list debut.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French, derivative of desbuter (to move, begin), from des- + but (mark, goal), from Old French but (aim, goal, end, target), either from Old French butte (mound, knoll, target), from Frankish *but (stump, log), or from Old Norse bútr (log, stump, butt); both from Proto-Germanic *butą (end, piece), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰÀud- (to beat, push).[1] Cognate with Old English butt (tree stump). More at English butt.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

début m (plural débuts)

  1. start, beginning

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Friedrich Kluge, “Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache” , 22. Auflage, 1989, bearbeitet von Elmar Seebold, ISBN 3-11-006800-1


External linksEdit