distinguishment

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

distinguish +‎ -ment.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dɪsˈtɪŋɡ.wɪʃ.mənt/

NounEdit

distinguishment (plural distinguishments)

  1. A distinction; observation of difference.
    • 1865, John Grote, Exploratio philosophica: rough notes on modern intellectual science, Part 1, University of Cambridge, page 50:
      "We notice what we notice and make it a thing distinguishing it from what else is within our view, partly because, doubtless, it is of such or such a size and shape: but we require more impulse to the notice and distinguishment than this furnishes."
    • 1833; Samuel Lewis Southard, Joseph Hendrickson, Thomas L. Shotwell, Edward Hopper; Argument of Samuel L. Southard: in the case of Stacy Decow and Joseph Hendrickson versus Thomas L. Shotwell, page 157:
      "And first, in your doctrines of God, whom you say is to be known and believed on, as in the distinguishment of three persons...

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

distinguishment in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913

Last modified on 19 October 2011, at 09:30