Last modified on 29 May 2014, at 18:07

endlike

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From end +‎ -like. Compare endly.

AdjectiveEdit

endlike (comparative more endlike, superlative most endlike)

  1. Of, relating to, or pertaining to the end; final; endly; terminal.
    • 2003, D. N. Sedley, The Cambridge Companion to Greek and Roman Philosophy:
      [...] and if there is more than one virtue, from the best and most final (or endlike) of them over a finished lifetime.
    • 2004, John Madison Cooper, Knowledge, nature, and the good: essays on ancient philosophy:
      I am proposing here to understand the qualifier τελεα in application to eudaimonia in X 7 (as with τελειοτάτη ἀρετÆ at I 7, 1098a18) as meaning “final” or “endlike,” in accordance with Aristotle's explicit statement [...]
    • 2007, Bernadette Bensaude-Vincent, William R. Newman, The artificial and the natural: an evolving polarity:
      Thus what Aristotle is referring to are endlike results that arise in nature but are produced in an unusual or [...]
    • 2008, Craig Hovey, To share in the body:
      Or, rather, here are some things that seem endlike, but they are not truly endlike. They only seem endlike because they reflect a posturing of false pretensions and surrogate determinances.
    • 2009, Aristotle, Lesley Brown, The Nicomachean Ethics:
      Invoking once again the criteria he laid down in I.7 for the best good, he tries to show that the contemplative life is most endlike and most self-sufficient, and surpasses the [...]

AdverbEdit

endlike (comparative more endlike, superlative most endlike)

  1. Endly; finally.
    • 2009, James Joyce, Finnegans Wake:
      Till ye finally (though not yet endlike) meet with the acquaintance of Mister Typus, Mistress Tope and all the little typtopies.