Last modified on 11 July 2014, at 18:07

expedition

See also: expédition

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle French expédition, and its source, Latin expeditio

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

expedition (plural expeditions)

  1. (obsolete) To act of expediting something; prompt execution.
  2. A military journey; an enterprise against some enemy or into enemy territory.
  3. (now rare) The quality of being expedite; speed, quickness.
    • 1719, Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe:
      one of them began to come nearer our boat than at first I expected; but I lay ready for him, for I had loaded my gun with all possible expedition […].
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, Tom Jones, Folio Society 1973, p. 331:
      he presently exerted his utmost agility, and with surprizing expedition ascended the hill.
    • 1979, John Le Carré, Smiley's People, Folio Society 2010, p. 33:
      The photographer had photographed, the doctor had certified life extinct, the pathologist had inspected the body in situ as a prelude to conducting his autopsy – all with an expedition quite contrary to the proper pace of things, merely in order to clear the way for the visiting irregular, as the Deputy Assistant Commissioner (Crime and Ops) had liked to call him.
  4. An important enterprise, implying a change of place; especially, a warlike enterprise; a march or a voyage with martial intentions; an excursion by a body of persons for a valuable end; as, a military, naval, exploring, or scientific expedition.
  5. The body of persons making such excursion.

TranslationsEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

expedition c

  1. an expedition, a journey, a mission
  2. an office

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit