Last modified on 16 December 2014, at 05:52

farness

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English fernesse, from Old English feornes (distance), equivalent to far +‎ -ness.

NounEdit

farness (usually uncountable, plural farnesses)

  1. The state of being far off, or the degree to which something is far; distance, span; remoteness
    • 1918, William James, The Principles of Psychology, page 217:
      If I look from a mountain, the things seen are vast in height and breadth, in proportion to the farness of the horizon.
    • 1980, Russel Hoban, Riddley Walker, edition Expanded, SciFi, ISBN 978-0-253-21234-4, published 1998:
      It's about the same farness from Cambry …
    • 2008, Lincoln Caplan, “Who Cares About Executive Supremacy?”, American Scholar, volume 77, number 1, page 20: 
      … the view of presidential power asserted by the administration of George W. Bush stands out for the farness of its far-reaching scope: …

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