farthingale

EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French verdugale, from Spanish verdugado, from verdugo (rod).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

farthingale (plural farthingales)

  1. (now historical) A hooped structure in cloth worn to extend the skirt of women's dresses; a hooped petticoat.
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.12:
      women [...] make trunk-sleeves of wyre and whale-bone bodies, backes of lathes, and stiffe bumbasted verdugals, and to the open-view of all men paint and embellish themselves with counterfeit and borrowed beauties [...].
    • 2003, Alexander Chancellor, The Guardian, 3 May 2003:
      In Henry VIII's Great Hall, there were men in doublets and codpieces prancing up and down with women in farthingales.

TranslationsEdit

Last modified on 9 October 2013, at 14:27