foredeem

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English *foredemen, from Old English foredēman (to prejudge), equivalent to fore- +‎ deem.

VerbEdit

foredeem (third-person singular simple present foredeems, present participle foredeeming, simple past and past participle foredeemed)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To judge, form a judgement of, or declare beforehand; foretell; forecast; presage.
    Which [maid] could guess and foredeem of things past, present, and to come.Genevan Testament.
  2. (transitive) To deem or account in advance; consider; take for granted; expect.
    Of a frende it was more standing with humanitee and gentlenesse to hope the best then to foredeme the worste. ― J. Udall.
    Laugh at your misery, as foredeeming you / An idle meteor. ― Webster.
    • 1918, John Duncan Quackenbos, Magnhild: a tale of psychic love:
      The doctor was as curious to learn how his suggestions would affect the conduct of Mrs. Radford when she should report to Blackwood, and he rightly foredeemed an early conference at the Lexington Avenue residence.

Related termsEdit

Last modified on 28 August 2013, at 14:58