foredoom

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From fore- +‎ doom. Compare foredeem.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfɔːduːm/ (noun), IPA(key): /fɔːˈduːm/ (verb)

NounEdit

foredoom (uncountable)

  1. A doom that is predicted; destiny.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

foredoom (third-person singular simple present foredooms, present participle foredooming, simple past and past participle foredoomed)

  1. (transitive) To predestine to a doom.
    • Dryden
      Thou art foredoomed to view the Stygian state.
    • 1922, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Chessmen of Mars[1], edition HTML, The Gutenberg Project, published 2010:
      To search for Tara of Helium in the vast, dim labyrinth of the pits of O-Tar seemed to the Gatholian a hopeless quest, foredoomed to failure.
    • 1932, Duff Cooper, Talleyrand, The Folio Society, published 2010, page 35:
      They appeared, upon the surface, to possess all the qualities which were likely to recommend them to the fashionable society of the day; but their mission was foredoomed to failure.

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

Last modified on 10 April 2014, at 12:05