gavial

EnglishEdit

A gavial
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Hindi घड़ियाल (ghaṛiyāl).

NounEdit

gavial (plural gavials)

  1. The crocodilian Gavialis gangeticus; any species of the family Gavialidae.
    • 2002, Pierre-Henri Gouyon, Jean-Pierre Henry, Jacques Arnould, Tiiu Ojasoo (translator), Gene Avatars: The Neo-Darwinian Theory of Evolution, [1997, Les avatars du gène: La théorie néodarwinienne de l'évolution], page 28,
      Cuvier had begun studying the fossils of crocodiles found near Caen and Honfleur in France. (They were, in fact, gavials, fine-jawed crocodiles that are nowadays found in India).
    • 2006, Lynn Huggins-Cooper, Ravenous Reptiles, page 19,
      Although human remains and jewelry have been found in their stomachs, gavials are not as fierce as many alligators and crocodiles.
    • 2011, Joseph T. Springer, Dennis Holley, An Introduction to Zoology: Investigating the Animal World, page 415,
      Gavials (or gharials) are found only on the northern Indian subcontinent, where most are riverine, being best adapted to calmer areas in deep fast-flowing rivers.

Usage notesEdit

Technically, extending the definition to family Gavialidae results in including just one other extant species: the false gavial (Tomistoma schlegelii). However, the subfamily Tomistominae is often (perhaps usually) excluded from Gavialidae.

SynonymsEdit

  • (Gavialis gangeticus): fish-eating crocodile, gharial, Indian gharial
  • (any species of Gavialidae): gavialid

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


SpanishEdit

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia es

EtymologyEdit

From French gavial, from Hindi घड़ियाल (gaṛiyāl, alligator, crocodile).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gavial m (plural gaviales)

  1. gavial, gharial
Last modified on 20 March 2014, at 01:18