get one's eye in

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

get one's eye in

  1. (chiefly UK, sports) To become accustomed to the playing conditions, and thus bring one's hand-eye coordination to a reasonable level.
  2. (chiefly UK) To develop a perceptual skill, especially visual.
    • 1881, The Entomologist's monthly magazine‎, page 163: 
      Having thus got my "eye in" for Bledii, numerous casts in my drive and garden footpaths were explored, and turned out to be those of B. opacus
    • 1898, Hugh Reginald Haweis, My musical life‎, page 217:
      To know fiddles and judge them you must be always looking at them. For a time, at least, I got my eye in by dwelling on the best models.
    • 1899, Arthur Lakes, Prospecting for Gold and Silver in North America‎, page 259:
      Why, I myself, old hand as I am, after being away for some months about town, or looking at other things, can't get my eye in and down to it for two or three days; then it kind of comes natural.
    • 1973 March, Baseball Digest‎, volume 32, page 20: 
      Roberto then took three swings, but did not move his legs or hips, just the arms and wrists-he was merely getting his eye in.
    • 1974, John Le Carré, Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy, page 95:
      He felt elated. Till now he had been living too much in the past, he decided. Time to get my eye in again.
    • 1997, His Majesty's Submarines‎, page 53:
      She had now got her eye in. A 10000-ton tanker heading for Tunisia with powerful escort got no farther than the north coast of Sicily.
    • 2008, Poppy Adams, The Sister‎, page 147:
      Once I'd got my eye in, it was quite impossible — without looking away first — to see the ceiling as flat again.
    • 2009, Leo Duff, Drawing - The Purpose‎, page 21:
      Someone who has 'got their eye in' has internalized an ability to draw to scale. While the new recruit stops all the time to take measurements, the drawing of someone with 'their eye in' flows.

See alsoEdit

Last modified on 20 June 2013, at 14:11