Last modified on 24 June 2014, at 04:29

go the distance

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

go the distance

  1. (boxing) To participate in a boxing match for its maximum number of rounds.
    • 1915, Jack London, The Little Lady of the Big House, ch. 20:
      "In a way it's like the quality of muscle and heart that enables some prizefighters to go the distance—twenty, thirty, forty rounds, say," Dick concurred.
    • 1976 November 21, Sylvester Stallone as Rocky Balboa, Rocky:
      It really don't matter if this guy opens my head, even, cause I all I wanna do is go the distance. Nobody's ever gone the distance with Creed, and if I can go that distance, seein' that bell ring and I'm still standin', I'm gonna know for the first time in my life, see, that I weren't just another bum from the neighborhood.
  2. (idiomatic, by extension) To have the endurance to see a difficult, sustained challenge to its natural end without faltering.
    • 1920, E. Phillips Oppenheim, The Devil's Paw, ch. 4:
      "Do you notice how every one is trying to avoid the subject of the war? . . . I am sure they cannot keep it up."
      "They won't go the distance," Julian whispered.
    • 2013 Oct. 18, Chad Bray, "HSBC to Appeal $2.46 Billion Judgment," New York Times (retrieved 23 June 2014):
      “We are very pleased that we went the distance in this case, all the way through a jury trial, and that we were able to obtain such a tremendous recovery for shareholders.”