heighth

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English hēahþu, hēhþu, hīehþu, equivalent to high +‎ -th. Cognate with Dutch hoogte.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

heighth (plural heighths)

  1. Obsolete spelling of height.
    • 1690, Nicholas Barbon, A Discourse of Trade [1]:
      In the Infancy of the World, Governments began with little Families and Colonies of Men; so that, when ever any Government arrived to greater Heighth than the rest, either by the great Wisdom or Courage of the Government, they afterwards grew a pace...
    • 1700, Colley Cibber, Richard III [2]:
      'Why then to me this restless World's but Hell,
      Till this mishapen trunks aspiring head
      'Be circled in a glorious Diadem --
      But then 'tis fixt on such an heighth, O!...
    • 1809, James Grey Jackson, An Account of the Empire of Marocco (London 1809, p. 169)
      The heighth of the celestial happiness is to see God (...).
    • 1826, James Fenimore Cooper, The Last of the Mohicans [3]
      " [] That! that, is the print of a foot, but 'tis the dark hair's; and small it is, too, for one of such a noble heighth and grand appearance! [] "
  2. (US, proscribed) Alternative form of height.
    • 1962, Anthony Burgess, A Clockwork Orange[4], edition Reprint, Fiction, Heinemann, published 2008, page 2:
      The four of us were dressed in the heighth of fashion, ...

ReferencesEdit

Last modified on 26 August 2013, at 22:40