Last modified on 24 May 2014, at 20:40
See also: Holm

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Alteration of hollin.

NounEdit

holm (plural holms)

  1. (obsolete except in dialects) The holly.
  2. A common evergreen oak, of Europe, Quercus ilex; the holm oak.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse holmi, holmr (islet), from the Proto-Germanic *hulmaz, from Proto-Indo-European root *kel (to rise, be elevated, be prominent; hill). Cognate with Old English holm (sea, ocean, wave), Old Saxon holm, Old Danish hulm, Middle Low German holm, German Holm, Middle Dutch holm, Swedish holme,

NounEdit

holm (plural holms)

  1. Land that is liable to flooding; a river island.
  2. (dialect, chiefly West Yorkshire) an islet, sometimes with holly bushes.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia da

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse holmr.

NounEdit

holm c (singular definite holmen, plural indefinite holme)

  1. a small island

InflectionEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *hulmaz (hill, rise).

NounEdit

holm m (plural holmen, diminutive holmpje n)

  1. a small island

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse holmr, also in Old Saxon, Frisian cognate. Root is Proto-Germanic *hulmaz (hill, rise), equivalent to Latin culmen "peak", compare culminate.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

holm m

  1. (poetic) ocean, sea, waters
    Ða wæs heofonweardes gast ofer holm boren. The spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.

DeclensionEdit


PolishEdit

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia pl

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

holm m

  1. holmium (chemical element, Ho, atomic number 67)

DeclensionEdit


SloveneEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hólm m inan (genitive hólma, nominative plural hólmi)

  1. hill

DeclensionEdit