Last modified on 4 September 2013, at 16:39

hondel

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Yiddish האַנדלען (handlen, to trade), from German handeln

VerbEdit

hondel (third-person singular simple present hondels, present participle hondelling or hondeling, simple past and past participle hondelled or hondeled)

  1. to bargain, to haggle
    • 1977, Janet Kaplan and Judy Stacey Goldman, The Underground Jerusalem Guide, Keter Pub. House:
      It's the clanging of cash registers, the banging of beads, hawking, hondelling and the hooting of horns.
    • 2000, Paul Wilkes, And They Shall Be My People: An American Rabbi and His Congregation, Grove Press, p. 135:
      Some might call it religious hondeling, but Rabbi Rosenbaum finds himself doing just that, and more often than he cares to admit.
    • 2002, Zalman Velvel, What is a Jew?:
      The Rabbi began to hondel with God, like Abraham, only in reverse. He asked for permission to make a 100 mistakes, then a thousand.
    • 2007, Don Winslow, The Winter of Frankie Machine, Vintage Books, p. 53:
      And I'll turn the offer down because it's a boss's kid, which Vince will understand: then we'll get down to the real hondeling.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

hondel (plural hondels)

  1. handle (device designed to be gripped or held in the hand)

DescendantsEdit