hondel

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Yiddish האַנדלען (handlen, to trade), from German handeln

VerbEdit

hondel (third-person singular simple present hondels, present participle hondelling or hondeling, simple past and past participle hondelled or hondeled)

  1. to bargain, to haggle
    • 1977, Janet Kaplan and Judy Stacey Goldman, The Underground Jerusalem Guide, Keter Pub. House:
      It's the clanging of cash registers, the banging of beads, hawking, hondelling and the hooting of horns.
    • 2000, Paul Wilkes, And They Shall Be My People: An American Rabbi and His Congregation, Grove Press, p. 135:
      Some might call it religious hondeling, but Rabbi Rosenbaum finds himself doing just that, and more often than he cares to admit.
    • 2002, Zalman Velvel, What is a Jew?:
      The Rabbi began to hondel with God, like Abraham, only in reverse. He asked for permission to make a 100 mistakes, then a thousand.
    • 2007, Don Winslow, The Winter of Frankie Machine, Vintage Books, p. 53:
      And I'll turn the offer down because it's a boss's kid, which Vince will understand: then we'll get down to the real hondeling.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

hondel (plural hondels)

  1. handle (device designed to be gripped or held in the hand)

DescendantsEdit

Last modified on 4 September 2013, at 16:39