Last modified on 4 December 2014, at 18:41

magus

See also: mágus

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin magus, from Ancient Greek μάγος (mágos, magician), from Μάγος (Mágos, Magian), of an indeterminate Old Iranian origin (see Μάγος for details)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

magus (plural magi)

  1. (common usage) magician, and derogatorily sorcerer, trickster, conjurer, charlatan
  2. (special usage) a Zoroastrian priest
Note: the two meanings overlap in classical usage— both derive from the Greco-Roman identification of "Zoroaster" as the "inventor" of astrology and magic. The first meaning ('magician') derives from the sense of "practitioner of the Zoroaster's craft", and the second meaning ('priest') from the sense of "practitioner of Zoroaster's religion".

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


EstonianEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

From the same root as Finnish makea.

AdjectiveEdit

magus (genitive magusa, partitive magusat)

  1. sweet (taste)

DeclensionEdit

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Derived termsEdit


GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

magus

  1. boy
  2. Romanization of 𐌼𐌰𐌲𐌿𐍃

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek μάγος (mágos, magician), from Μάγος (Mágos, Magian), of an indeterminate Old Iranian origin (see Μάγος (Mágos) for details)

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

magus m (feminine maga, neuter magum); first/second declension

  1. magic, magical

InflectionEdit

First/second declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case \ Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative magus maga magum magī magae maga
genitive magī magae magī magōrum magārum magōrum
dative magō magae magō magīs magīs magīs
accusative magum magam magum magōs magās maga
ablative magō magā magō magīs magīs magīs
vocative mage maga magum magī magae maga

NounEdit

magus m (genitive magī); second declension

  1. (common usage) magician, and derogatorily sorcerer, trickster, conjurer, charlatan
  2. (special usage) a Zoroastrian priest
Note: the two meanings overlap in classical usage— both derive from the Greco-Roman identification of "Zoroaster" as the "inventor" of astrology and magic. The first meaning ('magician') derives from the sense of "practitioner of the Zoroaster's craft", and the second meaning ('priest') from the sense of "practitioner of Zoroaster's religion".

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative magus magī
genitive magī magōrum
dative magō magīs
accusative magum magōs
ablative magō magīs
vocative mage magī

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit