Last modified on 28 November 2014, at 16:58

manœuvre

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

manœuvre (plural manœuvres)

  1. (UK) Alternative form of maneuver
    • 1850, Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre
      [] but then it came of itself: it was not elicited by meretricious arts and calculated manœuvres; and one had but to accept it — to answer what he asked []

VerbEdit

manœuvre (third-person singular simple present manœuvres, present participle manœuvring, simple past and past participle manœuvred)

  1. (UK) Alternative form of maneuver
    • 1954, Gilbert Ryle, Dilemmas: The Tarner Lectures, 1953, dilemma vii: Perception, page 103 (The Syndics of the Cambridge University Press)
      We can ask how long it was before the team scored its first goal; or how long the centre-forward spent in manœuvring the ball towards the goal; and even how long the ball was in flight between his kicking it and its going between the goal-posts. But we cannot ask how many seconds were occupied in the scoring of the goal.
    • 2003, David Miller, Political Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction, page 7 (Oxford University Press)
      [] and the belief that states had increasingly little room for manœuvre if they wanted their people to benefit from it.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Vulgar Latin manuopera, from ablative of Latin manus (hand) + opus (work).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

manœuvre f (plural manœuvres)

  1. move, movement
  2. operation, manoeuvre
  3. (military, in the plural) manoeuvres

NounEdit

manœuvre m (plural manœuvres)

  1. labourer

VerbEdit

manœuvre

  1. first-person singular present indicative of manœuvrer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of manœuvrer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of manœuvrer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of manœuvrer
  5. second-person singular imperative of manœuvrer

External linksEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

NounEdit

manœuvre f (plural manœuvres)

  1. maneuver (movement)