Last modified on 24 May 2014, at 23:36

mathesis

See also: Mathesis

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman mathesis, Middle French mathesie, and their source, Late Latin mathesis (astrology, liberal arts, science), from Ancient Greek μάθησις (máthēsis, learning), from the same base as μανθάνω (manthánō, I learn).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /məˈθiːsɪs/, /ˈmaθəsɪs/

NounEdit

mathesis (uncountable)

  1. (now rare) Mental calculation or discipline; science, especially mathematical learning. [from 15th c.]
    • 1997, Thomas Pynchon, Mason & Dixon:
      Forget the Boys, forget your loyalties to your Dead, first of all to Rebekah, for she, they, are but distractions, temporal, flesh, ever attempting to drag the Uranian Devotee back down out of his realm of pure Mathesis, of that which abides.
  2. The science of establishing a systematic order for things. (After Foucault.) [from 1970s]
    • 1997, Chris Horrocks, Introducing Foucault, page 69 (Totem Books, Icon Books; ISBN 1840460865)
      I’m using 'mathesis' — a universal science of measurement and order […].

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mathēsis f (genitive mathēsis); third declension

  1. mathematics
  2. astrology
  3. science

InflectionEdit

Third declension i-stem, alternative accusative singular in -im and ablative singular in .

Number Singular Plural
nominative mathēsis mathēsēs
genitive mathēsis mathēsium
dative mathēsī mathēsibus
accusative mathēsim
mathēsem
mathēsīs
mathēsēs
ablative mathēsī
mathēse
mathēsibus
vocative mathēsis mathēsēs