Last modified on 24 May 2014, at 23:43

megrim

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French migraigne, from Vulgar Latin pronunciation of Late Latin hemicrania (pain in one half of the head), from Ancient Greek ἡμικρᾱνίᾰ (hēmikrānía), from ἡμι- (hēmi-, hemi-, half) + κρανίον (kraníon, skull) (from whence also cranium).[1] Compare migraine, hemicrania.

NounEdit

megrim (plural megrims)

  1. (now rare) A headache; a migraine. [from 15th c.]
  2. (in the plural) Depression, low spirits, unhappiness. [from 16th c.]
  3. (now rare) A fancy, a whim, a caprice. [from 16th c.]
  4. (in the plural) Any of various diseases of animals, especially horses, marked by a disturbance of equilibrium and abnormal gait and behaviour such as staggers or a sudden vertigo, sometimes followed by unconsciousness; the staggers. [from 17th c.]
QuotationsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Origin unknown.

NounEdit

megrim (plural megrims)

  1. A type of European deep water flatfish, Lepidorhombus whiffiagonis; the whiff or sail-fluke.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ megrim” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

AnagramsEdit