necessariness

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

necessariness (uncountable)

  1. The state or characteristic of being necessary.
    • 1898, S. S. Laurie, "The Growth of Mind as a Real and the Influence of the Formal on the Real", The School Revew, vol. 6, no. 4, p. 255:
      Time and space are themselves part of the phenomena or object. . . . It is the necessariness of these perceptions which has led to their being elevated to the position of abstract wholes in which all things exist.
    • 1981, Jerald P. Keene, "The Ill-Advised State Court Revival of the 'McNabb-Mallory' Rule," The Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, vol. 72, no. 1, p. 222:
      The test was so general that defendant flooded the court's docket with appeals seeking judicial examination of the necessariness of prearraignment detentions.
    • 2001 Nov. 19, Jason Cowley, "Books: Still life in mobile homes," New Statesman (UK) (retrieved 30 Sep. 2008):
      A journey, one would think, ought to have a certain necessariness; there must be a reason for going.

Usage notesEdit

  • Necessitude, necessitousness, necessitation, necessariness are all nouns closely related to necessity, but they tend to have narrower ranges of usage than the term necessity. The principal sense of necessitude and necessitousness is impoverishment, but the plural form of the former (necessitudes) denotes a set of circumstances which is inevitable or unavoidable. Necessitation is used to suggest necessity as a philosophical or cosmic principle. Necessariness tends to be used to stress a direct connection to the adjective necessary.
Last modified on 10 April 2013, at 05:44