necessary

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English necessarye, from Old French necessaire, from Latin necessārius (unavoidable, inevitable, indispensable, requisite), from necesse (unavoidable, inevitable, indispensable), neuter adjective with esse and habeō (I have), probably originating from ne cessum or non cessum, from ne (not) + cessus, perfect passive participle of cēdō (I yield); see cede.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

necessary (comparative more necessary, superlative most necessary)

  1. needed, required
    • Shakespeare
      'Tis necessary he should die.
    • Tillotson
      A certain kind of temper is necessary to the pleasure and quiet of our minds.
  2. Such as must be; not to be avoided; inevitable.
    • Shakespeare
      Death, a necessary end, / Will come when it will come.
  3. Acting from necessity or compulsion; involuntary.
    Whether man is a necessary or a free agent is a question much discussed.

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NounEdit

necessary (plural necessaries)

  1. (archaic, UK) bathroom, toilet, loo

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Last modified on 2 April 2014, at 19:37