See also: oft-

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdverbEdit

oft (comparative ofter, superlative oftest)

  1. (chiefly poetic, dialectal, and in combination) often; frequently; not rarely; many times.
    An oft-told tale
    • 1623, William Shakespeare, All's Well That Ends Well, Act II, Scene 1, 1765, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens (editors), The Plays of William Shakespeare, Volume 4, 1778, page 45,
      What I can do, can do no hurt to try: / Since you ſet up your reſt 'gainſt remedy: / He that of greateſt works is finiſher, / Oft does them by the weakeſt miniſter; / So holy writ in babes hath judgment ſhown, / When judges have been babes.
    • 1819, George Gordon Byron, John Galt (biography), The Pophecy of Dante, Canto the Fourth, 1857, The Complete Works of Lord Byron, Volume 1, page 403,
      And how is it that they, the sons of fame, / Whose inspiration seems to them to shine / From high, they whom the nations oftest name, / Must pass their days in penury or pain, / Or step to grandeur through the paths of shame, / And wear a deeper brand and gaudier chain?
    • 1902, James H. Mulligan, In Kentucky, quoted in 2005, Wade Hall (editor), The Kentucky Anthology, page 203,
      The moonlight falls the softest / In Kentucky; / The summer days come oftest / In Kentucky;

Usage notesEdit

  • In widespread contemporary use in combination.

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German ofte, oft, uft, from Old High German ofta, ofto, oftu.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

oft

  1. often

SynonymsEdit


IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse oft (often) and opt (oft, often)

AdverbEdit

oft (comparative oftar, superlative oftast)

  1. often
    Ég fer oft í ræktina.
    I often go to the gym.
    Ég er oftast í tölvunni.
    I spend most of my time on the computer.
    Ég hef sigrað oftar en þú!
    I've won more often than you!

Derived termsEdit

  • oftar en ekki (more often than not)

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Proto-Germanic *ufta

AdverbEdit

oft

  1. often

DescendantsEdit


Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Proto-Germanic *ufta

AdverbEdit

oft

  1. often

DescendantsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

Proto-Germanic *ufta

AdverbEdit

oft

  1. often

DescendantsEdit

  • Low German: oft

Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 01:11