Last modified on 17 December 2014, at 00:41

pompous

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old French pompeux, from Late Latin pomposus, from Latin pompa (pomp), from Ancient Greek πομπή (pompḗ, a sending, a solemn procession, pomp), from πέμπω (pémpō, I send).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

pompous (comparative more pompous, superlative most pompous)

  1. Affectedly grand, solemn or self-important.
    • 1848, Thackeray, William Makepeace, Vanity Fair, Bantam Classics (1997), 16:
      "Not that the parting speech caused Amelia to philosophise, or that it armed her in any way with a calmness, the result of argument; but it was intolerably dull, pompous, and tedious; and having the fear of her schoolmistress greatly before her eyes, Miss Sedley did not venture, in her presence, to give way to any ebullitions of private grief."

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