Last modified on 29 July 2014, at 21:12

pretext

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French prétexte, from Latin praetextum (an ornament, etc., wrought in front, a pretense), neuter of praetextus, past participle of praetexere (to weave before, fringe or border, allege).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

pretext (plural pretexts)

  1. A false, contrived, or assumed purpose or reason; a pretense.
    The reporter called the company on the pretext of trying to resolve a consumer complaint.

SynonymsEdit

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VerbEdit

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Wikipedia

pretext (third-person singular simple present pretexts, present participle pretexting, simple past and past participle pretexted)

  1. To employ a pretext, which involves using a false or contrived purpose for soliciting the gain of something else.
    The spy obtained his phone records using possibly-illegal pretexting methods.

SynonymsEdit

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See alsoEdit

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